KEEP YOU "POSTED"

by Miryam Muller in


A recap after a month’s publishing, we’d like to share with you our favorite posts.

Teenage girl Lana Sator snuck into a NPO Energosmash factory outside of Moscow & took a series of photographs of the installation.

The trailer for the upcoming Wes Anderson film Moonrise Kingdom, see it here.

Shipwrecked If an orbiting ship wrecked a small group of technologically advanced human families on a finite system...

Fotoshop by Adobé’ is a parody commercial from filmmaker Jesse Rosten about today’s beauty standards and the way beauty industry works.

Smudged with dirt, various plastic body parts including heads and tiny hands are strewn around an eerie abandoned building in these incredible photos of an abandoned doll factory in Spain.

Australian architect and paper artist Horst Kiechle recently constructed this geometric paper torso complete with modular organs including lungs, intestines, kidneys, pancreas, stomach and more.

Adbusting is a growing trend in the Eastern and Western U.S. Adbusting, also known as culture jamming, sees artists coming together to change existing advertisements with works of art.

For her series titled “Broken Butterflies” artist Anne ten Donkelaar repaired the damaged wings of real butterflies using gold, old maps, roots, threads and embroidery.

Since 1959, German artists Bernd and Hilla Becher dedicated themselves to registering the remnants of the industrial age in Western Europe and the United States through photography. Read more.

Thinking back to the cameras of the ’50s and ’60s Lomography just took the next great leap in their vintage photographic evolution and launched their first-ever movie camera, the LomoKino.


AUGMENTED REALITY APP MAKES ADBUSTING A LEGAL AND VIABLE WAY TO MAKE ART

by Miryam Muller in


Adbusting is a growing trend in the Eastern and Western U.S. Adbusting, also known as culture jamming, sees artists coming together to change existing advertisements with works of art. These works often hold some cultural commentary and are seen as vandalism in large cities. For some artists, the issue of vandalism can be quite the deterrent. As such, artists have begun using augmented reality as a way to carry out their adbusting goals.

The Public Ad Campaign, a group of New York-based artists that considers all advertisements to be public property, has developed an augmented reality app for the iPhone and iPad. The app is based on augmented reality technology coming from Junaio, a technology company based in Germany. Using the app, smart phone owners can point their devices at advertisements and see them replaced with pieces of art done by members of the group. In this way, the Public Ad Campaign can circumvent vandalism laws as these laws do not apply to virtual space.

Replacing ads with artistic commentary has long been an underground trend in the world of art. Artistic vandalism began gaining mainstream appeal after acclaimed UK artist Banksy grew in fame. While some would consider virtual adbusting as vandalism, augmented reality has become a very powerful tool for artists looking for a new medium in which to express themselves.

Via Mobile Commerce News